Moyamoya, Ivy Sign, FMD, HSV-1 and VZV – Rare Causes and Stroke in the Young

There couldn’t be a better reason for getting up early! The Wednesday morning-scientific communication “Rare Causes and Stroke in the Young“ offered fascinating talks on rare stroke causes that are likely to be overseen in crowded emergency rooms and stroke units. Our eager speakers travelled from all over the world to Gothenburg and brought along intriguing cases and case series from their local hospitals. Ki-Woong Nam from the Republic of Korea, for instance, presented us a case series on 165 patients with Moyamoya disease, which is hardly seen in our European hospitals. Richard Hughes from the United States presented a case series of patients, in which HSV-1 reactivation was associated with the manifestation of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) – a finding that will certainly be investigated in more detail in future studies. Bonnie Fan from the Netherlands reported a significant association between stroke incidence and subsequent cancer diagnosis in patients < 50 years, suggesting cancer as an important potential cause of cryptogenic stroke in young adults. Further talks focused on Susac syndrome, the association between cerebral venous thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistulas, and the use of thrombolysis in adolescents.

Fascinating talks and motivated speakers made this communication a highlight of this year’s ESO conference. The audience learned an incredible lot about rare causes of cerebrovascular disease, which will certainly get more attention in our future clinical careers.

Speakers and chairs of the session “Rare causes and Stroke in the Young (from left to right): Erik Lindgren (Sweden), Stéphanie Machado (France), Daniela Pinter (Austria), Ki-Woong Nam (Republic of Korea), Thomas Rambaud (France), Chair Andrei Alexandrov (USA), Chair Antje Schmidt (Germany), Georgina Meredith (United Kingdom), Michael Hughes (USA), Bonnie Fan (The Netherlands), Myrna van Dongen (The Netherlands)